Sunday, October 14, 2007

Manila: Malabon, Metro Manila's hidden gem

Today, I joined a tour of Malabon called "Halina lusungin natin ang Malabon" organized by concerned people of Malabon led by Atty. Monchet Lucas of Rufina Patis, Leona Nepomuceno of DOT, Terry de Jesus a home owner, and Archt. Richard Bautista of the NCCA.

Our tour began with a briefing and a sumptuous lunch at the Pescadores restaurant at Letre Road corner Dagat-Dagatan Avenue. We then proceeded to our first stop, the San Bartolome Church. I had high expectations for this church knowing that it was one of the untouched churches in Metro Manila. But to our shock, it's in the process of being uglified by the current parish priest who is not even a native of Malabon.

The current hard-headed parish priest, Fr. Ric Torrefiel, has all but listened to the objections of the local community about his kitsch and tasteless renovations. Sadly, he was the same priest who bastardized the interior of the old Concepcion Church, also in Malabon.

I hope the townsfolk of Malabon stops this priest from wreaking more havoc to this historic church by halting all their donations to this utter waste of church funds. Why don't priests simply focus on their spiritual role rather than push their parishioners to cough out money to satisfy their whims and caprices? That money is best spent fulfilling the pastoral needs and responsibilities of the church.

Members of the group were aghast! From a simple but elegant centuries-old church, Fr. Torrefiel has managed to turn it into a cheap, gaudy, tasteless, kitsch, cabaret-like interior enumerating some of the adjectives blurted out by those in the tour. On the exterior, he painted fake brick lines! And when we asked the tour organizers about it, they said that the more the local people stop him, the more he pushes for what he wants. Now where is the CBCP when you need it?

Anyway, after that depressing first stop, we walked to Betsy's Cake House to have a taste of their broas and view the works of the silent artist, Serafin Serna, a contemporary of Fernando Amorsolo.

We went from one house to another. The group first entered the Dionisio House. Then we moved to Concepcion to visit three Luna houses, the Borja House, and Paez House, as well as the Concepcion Church which Fr. Torrefiel had already bastardized. We also dropped by Dolor's Kakanin to check out their sapin-sapin.

We also visited the home and gallery of Angel Cacnio, an artist whose works have been used by the Central Bank on our bills and coins. From Concepcion, we moved to the Rufina Patis Factory, passing by other old houses along the way. Indeed, Malabon is a treasure trove of heritage, which is sadly deteriorating due to the annual flood and subsidence (sinking of the ground).

From Rufina Patis, we were served a sumptuous Malabon merienda at the Martinez House. Of course, there was pancit malabon, puto bumbong, puto sulot, bibingka, pichi-pichi, sumpia (in Malabon, lumpia is fresh, sumpia is fried, what we know as turon is called valencia and when you say turon, it means it's filled with mongo beans), kikiam and camachile biscuits (which we thought were tamarinds), among many others.

Then we moved to the oldest known house of Malabon dated 1861, the Raymundo House. Behind the house, we got to see the Malabon-Navotas shipyards. The two towns are separated by a strait (and not a river) since we always forget that Malabon and Navotas are islands. In fact, during the Spanish colonial period, they were totally detached from the island of Luzon. It was Imelda who reclaimed most of the lagoons around the islands, thus erasing their former charm.

From the Raymundo House, we attended the soft opening of the Bahay Parokiyano Gallery, a place for local artists to showcase their works. Indeed, this trip to Malabon was most worth it! Thanks to the organizers for inviting us, and filling both our stomachs and our minds. For more photos of Malabon and Navotas heritage, check out Richard's Multiply.

68 comments:

  1. Hi Ivan, is that a regular tour that's available to the public?

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  2. No plans yet. The organizers just wanted to introduce us to Malabon. I'll let everyone know if there are future plans.

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  3. please do let us know ha? taga-malabon ako...tugatog, but i never thought na ang dami palang historical places na pwede kong bisitahin dito sa min. i've been to old Concepcion church, ordered our pancit malabon and sapin-sapin at dolors though... =)

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  4. wow, i love old houses. jay and i recently went to angono and went on a walkathon to look at the murals and other artworks. maybe i'll ask him to go to malabon next time. oh, and i feel deeply for the bastardization of the old churches. historic architecture should be preserved, since they not only enrich our culture, but also strengthen our filipino identity, and give us a tangible link to the lost past.

    hay...it really breaks my heart.:(

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  5. You'll be surprised! Malabon has so much. And it's spread all over the island. I wished Imelda did not reclaim the lagoons around it so that the old charm of the place was preserved.

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  6. sayang naman about San Bartolome. history repeating, after all, it was the catholic church that destroyed much of the "pagan" culture of our forefathers.

    on your tour, was photography allowed using DSLRs? i was rudely prevented from using mine at the Riverbanks park in Marikina. Hello?! Riverbanks!

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  7. Most definitely! Hehe! Now what does Riverbanks have against DSLRs?

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  8. Astig!

    Pati patis hindi pinalampas.. Haha!

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  9. Siyempre! It's the product of the place! Haha!

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  10. Hi Ivan! Your photos of Malabon are gorgeous! Your participation to our tour is deeply appreciated and then this site......You are welcome to come back to Malabon and perhaps taste other sweets and savories of this town.Thank you very much! Leona

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  11. Hi Leona, thank you very much for that wonderful tour. I'd be most happy to come back for more! :)

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  12. Another great tour. It is nice you record all your travels and share your experiences. It always give me ideas for a trip out of town.

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  13. Ivan,

    Sorry to hear that the once beautiful church is being desecrated by this priest. He is just like Atienza who during his term tried to "beautify" Manila. You might be disappointed with what the church is hierarchy is doing.

    Its sad how some people destroys our heritage. I apprenticed under the late Jun Gonzales during the restorations of Intramuros. Unlike other countries, we continue to destroy our historical wealth. Its really very sad.

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  14. Thanks Ivan for visiting and featuring Malabon...truly, there's a lot of treasures in our hometown...but just like the priest, the mayor is also bastardizing the city..endless potholes and garbage greets motorist and dwellers of this place. Sayang.

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  15. Ramona31.1.08

    Ivan,
    I agree that Malabon has a lot of historical places to offer. I hope more people will acknowledge that the town I came from is a unique place.

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  16. Anonymous19.3.08

    I just browsed through your blog this am, and I thank you for writing about my hometown. It is full of history beyond what you may have uncovered that is only in the memory of the old folks I met growing up there; unfortunately, a definitive history about the place is yet to be written.

    You mentioned about the bastardization of the town - I vividly remember it having begun at the time they started land reclamation of the fish ponds that is now dagat-dagatan. Quite unfortunate for such a very beautiful town - destroying its past for a "questionable" progress.

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  17. Sigh! Yes, Dagat-dagatan. Such lovely lagoons gone!

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  18. Anonymous14.6.08

    I grew up in Malabon & studied at ICPS and St. James Academy but now living in Laguna.
    I miss the Malabon of old, very clean, no floods, few tricycles, everybody knew everybody, simbang gabi at Concepcion church... haaay....

    If I could only turn back the clock.

    I really miss those times

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  19. Anonymous11.7.08

    Hi! Ivan. I wonder if the old house of the Chikiamco's along Naval St. Extension. I remember as a child 40 years ago that it was pretty old then. Maybe you can ask the organizer to do some research on it!

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  20. richard tuason-sanchez bautista12.7.08

    hello Anonymous said... , i am richard, part of the organizer. I have done research about malabon, and have documented what ever i can still document in malabon and navotas.

    regarding the chikiamco house, what in particular are you interested to know.

    one thing i will say, it is in mint condition, it is old and pretty. well kept. though it is not easy to go inside the house. not unless you have access to the family like what i did.

    im happy to hear and read that the tours our group organized, and ivan's blog touched the hearts of my townmates.
    Richard Tuason-Sanchez Bautista

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  21. It is true that Malabon is a gem, if not for those historical sites, but for the people. Not the recent settlers from other provinces in the last couple of decades, but the real residents of Malabon/Navotas.

    Did you also visit the Tropicana Studio in Concepcion (where the old LVN & Sampaguita Pictures stars used to hang out during the golden age of Philippine cinema) and the "Sesame Street" between Dampalit and Muzon? The last one used to be a long strip of road connecting the two baranggays, surrounded by a vast network of fish ponds on both sides. But I think now there are some houses there, destroying the view. And the Dampalit church (Sto. Rosario Parish) is a beauty.

    I've been lucky to have been classmates (from St. James Academy) and family friends with the ones who own some of the old houses in Malabon, so I got to visit some of them when I was younger (Daza/Pascual-Arsenio, Borja, Luna/Teodoro, Santos, Pascual, Salao (Dampalit)). I might have been to the others but I can't remember now.

    We still live in Malabon. Originally from Dampalit, now we live in Tañong, very near St. James Academy, just in between the Syjuco and the Punzalan houses.

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  22. thanks for this wonderful travelogue. i am from malabon... still is! but i did not pay much attention to what we have. am not even familiar with the cacnio art gallery.... where is this located.

    it would help if the malabon municipal government would help maintain and probably enhance the given structures para naman maging tourist spot ang malabon.... somehow.

    one good resto, too, which you should try is the "balsa sa niugan". its in the heart of tonsuya and can be found in an 'esquinita' in front of the san antonio de padua church. as the name connotes, you take your meals aboard a balsa (raft). they also serve good food. somehow, it gives sets an ambience of dining in the middle of a palaisdaan which malabon was known for, until the marcos government transformed the vast fishponds into the 'dagat-dagatan' area we now know.

    at least though, we still have a piece of that palaisdaan along gov w. pascual avenue which is a several meters away from the famous dolor's kakanin and the famous nanay's pancit malabon. and i just hope the malabon government, preseve this as well

    thanks for sharing

    lorie sevilla-manalansan

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  23. richard tuason-sanchez bautista11.8.08

    Angel Cacnio Gallery is along Basilio Bautista Blvd, near Gabriel Subdivision in Hulo. Going to Dampalit, it is to your left before the lechonan. There is a dental clinic in front of the house runned by his daughter.

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  24. hi! this is a friend of Malabon speaking....was there any reason why the old home of the late Manuel Syjuco Sr was not included in your list of toured homes...it is located at Tanyong and sinking too...come typhoon season!! by the way .... keep sending email tours to us here in the U.S.A. .... home is just an email away for us.....thanks guys!

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  25. richard tuason-sanchez bautista11.8.08

    During the tour, the group prepared an itinerary that will be convenient to park, logictics was the main concern. but yes, the manuel syjuco (baby syjuco, formerly the gaza house) is very much interesting for it is among the oldest exisitng house in malabon

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  26. Hi Ivan, do you know you can get in prison for using names in your article? Are you professional to put that in their ? or to tell harsh things to these town?

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  27. I'm simply echoing what all my hosts from Malabon told me about what's happening to their town church. I'm simply stating what everyone in the tour said about the uglifications.

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  28. rpambid, when is free speech a crime? I agree with Ivan. Ivan speak out. Cheers

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  29. congrats to a job well done! Is it the Camus 300 yr old Spanish house that you photographed next to Malabon Navotas river in Camus st? That's a historical site being visited by Dr. Jose Rizal and then, became a Japanese garrison during World War II.

    Evelyn Camus Alcantara

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  30. richard tuason-sanchez bautista11.8.08

    Hello Ms Philippines,

    Yes, your house (camus) was visited by the group last october. Hoping that your family will also do something with such a legacy. hoping that it can be used as something.


    richard

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  31. I have started to raise funds with the help of big corporations in the Philippines, such as Philippine Airlines and Century Properties. They are willing to give a portion of thier commissions to our charity such as SJAAA, Inc. and St. James Academy and restoration of San Bartolome. See our high school alumni website, www.sjaaa.net/index.htm & my class website, www.groups.yahoo.com/group/sja_class_61/.

    Who would be the right organization we can give the donation to help claim our river and restore our churches? I have been away from the Philippines since 1969.

    Cesar M. Alba

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  32. Richard would be the right person to ask. Let's wait for his reply.

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  33. Hi! I am one of the Borja descendants. Thank you so much for featuring the Borja house in your travelogue. It's a well-preserved house. Everything here are in its original state. My 89-year old father would be so happy about your feature. In fact, he grew up in this house. This was built by his father (Manuel G. Borja, a Spanish mestizo) and mother (Leona Roxas, a Chinese mestiza). I'll tell him about it. By the way, my father was also from Ateneo (Padre Faura), Batch 1938. He was an "interno" with the Jesuit Fathers since he was in grade 3.

    Rita Santos Borja-Bundalian :-)
    Concepcion, Malabon City

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  34. richard tuason-sanchez bautista11.8.08

    hi stritz,

    thank you for that thought. i have always been fascinated by your ancestral house. your cousin nesty became my classmate in st. james, and he was my key to entering your ancestral house. and fortunately they were cooperative. also thank you in advance for helping us in the endeavor to save malabon's heritage

    richard

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  35. I left Malabon in 1969, I believe Atty. Monchet Lucas is the brother of Anton Lucas, the classmate of my brother in St. James. Anton is living here in the USA. Her sister is married to my classmate, Teofilo Gonzales who is now living in LA. I wonder how can I get hold of Atty. Monchet Lucas, Richard Baustista or Leona Nepumuceno. I am quite sure we all know each other. My email address: cesarmalba@hotmail.com.

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  36. Hi Ivan,

    I guess you are not aware of the Camanava Flood Control Project. Caloocan, Malabon, Navotas, Valenzuela areas that the government is trying to do to protect those areas from flooding. If you read about the news in the internet, they already have a project study and a comprehensive plan to build dikes and retainer walls all the way from the mouth of Manila Bay to Valenzuela, Bulacan. The project has been halted due to designed flaws that they found since 2003 and they could not figure out how to proceed with confidence that their engineering and design flaws that has been submitted by the Japanese Consultants can be remedied.

    The Department of Public Works seem to have started the project without a local reputable engineering and design firm to oversee the whole project made by the Japanese Consulting firm with P3.9 Billion loan. The DPW has done it on their own without confidence that make it very difficult to re-evaluate correct the design flaws to hire a local reputable engineering consultant to proceed with confidence due to budget constraint. Tying to do it on their own without the experts overseeing the whole projects is a waste of time and money. The Phase 1 of the project should have been finished this year but nothing have gotten started yet.

    Nobody seems to know what is going on in Malabon. Where are the concerned citizens?

    Cesar

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  37. It is that same flood project which led to the demolition of a very important heritage building. Ano nga ulit yan Richard? And it's thus a pity if they weren't doing it properly since the building was then demolished for nothing.

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  38. richard tuason-sanchez bautista12.8.08

    its the asilo de huerfanos in longos. a.k.a. / or more known as, the philippine tannery

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  39. Do the families still live in these houses or have they been turned into museums?

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  40. richard tuason-sanchez bautista12.8.08

    a number still live there. seldom do you see a house there where only the care takers stay.

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  41. I heard that San Bartolome Church dome has finally been restored, I am wondering who won on the tug of war on how to restore this historical monument.

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  42. richard tuason-sanchez bautista12.8.08

    the parish priest, he did it his way, and it is tooooooo _____ (no adjective to use)

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  43. Can you tell us exactly what he did differently to restore this historic chruch and what he should have done in order to put it in the original grandeur?

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  44. richard tuason-sanchez bautista12.8.08

    the dome of the church was an 18th century one, complete with its original roof framing. it was only learned until that typhoon destroyed it. there were acanthus leaf details, bead and reel design, etc....when the works were done, these details were removed, thinking that it will be returned after the repairs. low and behold, it was not returned, instead, a very non malabon ceiling was installed. the shape of the dome changed, though the lanternatop the dome was returned, but it is not anymore the original one. there were numerous changes. and the stories goes on........................ i doubt if it can be returned again, with the shape and materials are changed.

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  45. Thanks for featuring the house now we own. We bought this way back in Nov. 1991 and preserved to its present state. We are glad and very proud that there is a group of Filipino professionals with patriotic vision like you using e facilities to its fullest and touching the lives of Filipinos around the globe. I just want to make a comment on the description if I may such as "This is formerly owned by the Luna's and now by the Teodoro's." By the way, just feel free to visit us on a Saturday or on a Sunday whenever you are in town.

    Mrs. Merlita Gozon Teodoro

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  46. richard tuason-sanchez bautista14.8.08

    Hi Merlita,

    How we wish that the next tour we will organize, you will open your doors to us. Defintely your house is among the treasures of the town. Specially when the road wasnt raised. It is so imposing and aristocratic, and very well maintained.

    Richard

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  47. Anonymous10.9.08

    Hi! im also from malabon. brgy concepcion exactly. :) nice to know someone appreciates the hidden beauty of this floody city. :) i studied at icps then st. james academy. i had first hand experience of the transformation of the 2 churches near both schools. i really liked the old conception church. i think it doesnt need any renovation, just restoration but there nothing i can do about it. about san bartoleme church, which by the way is the same age as Dr. Jose rizal(accdg to our 3rd yr hs filipino teacher) it is still under renovation. fr. ric is not yet finish 'ruining' it. hehehe.. hope to see more of these. :) tc everyone!

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  48. Marianne David25.9.08

    Mr. Ivan, I am thankful for finding a site of yours where I can use some information regarding the what-to-know-about Malabon, particularly in Brgy. Concepcion.

    As i have read in your blog entry, you have had a very personal and debatable comments regarding infrastructures in our city. But, having freedom of speech doesn't mean to say things/ post an entry with very negative impressions of a person/ place

    If you want to comment on a debatable issue, for example, the projects of Fr. Ric Torrifiel, you SHOULD present both the positive and negative sides of the picture, as to let the people know of it (2nd hand experience).

    Honestly speaking, renovations are very inevitable to be planned in a city like Malabon because of the constant flooding. Though, we, citizens of this place wanted to preserve these historical places, we can not shield the fact that they will worn out.

    Moreover, if these renovations were not pushed through, how can we use it? i mean, some of the structural designs of the historical places are not that strong after a hundred years (or so) after being built.

    IF you want a cultural heritage to be maintained, changes are to be made.

    On the bright side, I know you have had a very informative and debatable trip around Malabon.


    Anyway, good luck to you.

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  49. I didn't know the flooding in Malabon reaches the ceiling of the Malabon Church. That's what Fr. Ric uglified!

    Pampanga also floods and floors have been raised. And there is nothing wrong with that. But spending for cheap and tasteless decor for the church ceiling is a big waste of funds. Plus it destroys the historicity of the church.

    No need to talk to Fr. Ric about that since his horrible renovation speaks for itself. The money could have been spent for the pastoral mission of the church instead. Don't you think?

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  50. eddie_nuevo9.10.08

    These old Manila architectures gives the city such a charm (something you will never find in any other Asian countries), sadly they are disappearing! BTW for some reason those obstructive power lines are becoming Manilas new landscape. What is going on?!

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  51. Anonymous20.10.08

    Hi Ivan! Do you know if there is a similar tour available to the public at this time? I have friends and a cousin who's from Malabon. I know that the town produces an array of delectable food, but I didn't know that it's rich in beautiful ancestral homes as well. My husband and I are very interested to get this town more.

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  52. Hi! Is there a regular tour available for the public by now? I'm really interested and I heard a lot from malabon especially their food.

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  53. Anonymous3.12.08

    Mr. Richard Tuason-Sanchez Bautista :

    Since you seem to be the "appointed" historian here :-), may I suggest, if possible, that you also share with everyone what you know of another "destroyed" historical site in Malabon - the Cine Concepcion.

    I grew up near that place. What I know is that it was among the country's modern cinema at the time it was built (sometime in the 1930's). The architecture was likewise "grand". I've also heard it became a Japanese garrison during the war - where a lot of our "kababyans" suffered at the hands of the occupiers. My mom tells me she remembers hearing the cries of our kababayan's during those times.

    How about the historical battle between the "Romanos" and the "Aglipayanos" in the early 1900's? How come the battle was only confined in the area of Concepcion but never occurred in the nearby areas of San Bartolome, San Jose, or Dampalit - which also has the old churches. This event of the town still baffles me - quite a curiosity for me regarding the town - considering that key Malabon personalities like the Lunas and Bernardos were involved.

    Best regards.

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  54. richard tuason-sanchez bautista3.12.08

    hi anonymous,

    cine concepcion as we know was owned by then the very wealthy paez cruz. this was named concepcion, other than it was located in concepcion, also the grand matriarch dona concepcion paez cruz. this movie house was designed by national artist for architecture pablo antonio. this was a prime movie house then. im not too sure when the moviw house closed, but it was neglected. i never saw the interiors of the movie house, but how i wished that before it was torn down i was able to go inside.

    regarding the battle between the romanos and the aglipayans, this, as far as i know, followed isabelo delos reyes, who happened to have married someone from malabon. and in relation to the lupang mitra A(mitre's land), which was runned by the roman catholic church. this land stretched from san bartolome upto women's club. and those living in the said area was paying their rent to the church. this land was a donation made in 1734, with a will that stated that for 100 years, the rent will be used to construct the san bartolome church. it went beyond. and there are other things din that caused it.

    concepcion and dampalit became an aglipayan church then.

    also, are you aware about the blas family, and it possible relationship to the promotion of methodist church in malabon? the story of how simeon blas got his wealth in the late 19th century? its rather trivial, but i have not made a thorough examination of it yet. but the story is related to the british investment in malabon. may it be the tranvia or the malabon sugar central.

    there are other un explored places in malabon which is worth noticing. as i have mentioned, isnt it rather strange for malabon to have a sugar central and malabon was never a sugar farm.

    also, i dont call myself a historian, i made thesis about malabon's heritage, specifically the ancestral houses, and other old structures. understanding what happened in malabon. in numerous ways lead to historical events and personalities. and i chance upon some written articles here, there, where ever, and until i have compiled materials.

    if you want, i can meet up with you one of these days and we can have an exchange of thoughts. i will be more than happy to share what i have gathered.

    just drop me a line so that i can arrange things.

    richard tuason-sanchez bautista

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  55. Anonymous23.12.08

    richard tuason-sanchez bautista

    Thank you for your kind thoughts on the matters I raised re : Cine Concepcion.

    There seems to be some other interesting trivias you have posted as well - such as about the Blas.

    I'll pick you up in your invite to meet and will post via your multiply account. I don't know how much I can share, as I haven't been living in Malabon this past 15 years. But I still have a lot of memories of my town - and yes that includes our escapade when, as kids, we sneak inside the Concepcion theather.

    Best regards and Merry Christmas.

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  56. Anonymous30.3.09

    Hi, Ivan!

    Wow! Reading the articles and comments was a trip down memory lane. My family's root are from Malabon and no matter what the situation is, that town has a special place in my heart.
    Actually, we also have a share in the Malabon's history in terms of trade and commerce. My grandparents owned KING'S STORE located at Bgy. Tanong. They use to sell fabrics, laces, dressmakers' needs,art supplies,etc. It was one of the oldest business establishments until it finally closed shop last 2008. Anybody who lives or lived in Malabon knows that store.
    Ivan, thanks for spending time in our little town of Malabon. Hope it left good memories for you, as it did for us.

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  57. honeyluv22.5.09

    Hello..

    Gud day to ol!

    Wow, very interesting site! actually im also "tubong malabon-dampalit" and i spend 28 years of my life in Malabon and im very happy on dat... i graduated in elisa esquerra high school class 1997.how sad nga lng kasi napabayaan na ang alma mater ko. Do u have any idea to wat happen in EEHS? is der any chance ba na mag open ulit...

    How about the ULTRA VISTA near in hulo, malabon.. i still remember na un ang favorite tambayan ng daddy ko nung bata pa sya..

    and dats tru na maganda ang malabon and besides of dat mayaman sa yamang dagat.. my grand grand father Angel Pablo Calderon is a fisherman on 1885.. kaya lng sa ngayon almost private property ang mga fishpond sa dampalit, means bawal na mamansing... And da PAGODA evry fiesta, its so exciting.. and until now sarap pa rin panoorin...

    And one more thing, can i ask a favor to ol of u.. could u please take a visit on dampalit elementary school main in Rodriguez dampalit malabon... and is thier any way na my maitulong kayo.. or just post it.. para nmn maging aware ang ang mga tao and specially our govt. Pinabayaan na nila ito... Imagine, naglagay na lng sila ng stairs sa may bintana ng second floor pra dun dumaan ang mga students kasi baha na at di na mapakinabangan ang ground floor.. Nakakaawa ang mga bata sa dampalit malabon... they really need our help..

    Thanks 2 all.. and more power!

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  58. Another historical site in Malabon is Gregorio Sanciangco's house in Tonsuya, I dont know if this was preserved. Regarding the EEHS building, its already delapitated and on sale right now. One alumni post the video of EEHS in youtube. You can see the current condition of it.Do you know that Dr. Jose Rizal mentioned Malabon in Noli Me Tangere. If I remember, its located in the Chapter of Sisa, where he mentioned "tubuhan sa Malabon". Kaya biglang naconnect sa isip ko ang Central Azucarera de Malabon sa forum na ito. Ultravista Cinema was already gone, it became a commercial center na, even the famous Filipinas Theather, gasolinahan na. Do you know also that Leonor and Estrella Theater are hangouts of LVN and Sampaguita Stars. I was informed that Nida Blanca "real name: Dorothy Jones" was discovered in Leonor Theater by her friend Delia Razon and introduced to Doña Sisang of LVN Studios? Im living in Tañong, and Im glad that Sy Juci and Gaza house are mentioned here. They are old houses na rin.Sana mas lalo pa nating madevelop ang educational and heritage tour sa Malabon.

    My lolo was a sacristan of San Bartolome Church before and after Japanese occupation. He said to me that the main altar in malabon has a secret passageway connecting the old tower in San Bartome Cemetery. But after the Japanese occupation, it was closed because of some unexplained things that happen. During the time of Fr. Egos (+), the old 4 portraits of evangelists was change plus the old painting of the station of the cross. Lolo also inform me that all chandeliers in San Bartolome are made of silver, but now we dont know where is it? The tabak of San Bartolome, during the time of Japanese occupation was lost from the thieves, but during the Liberation of Manila it was returned. The old bell of San Bartolome Church also fell down during the Japanese Occupation.It also serves as the garisson of American and Japanese forces. The biggest and most precious discovery that I found out is that a portion of the bone of St. Bartolome is enshrined to the church.The Vatican and Arch. Rufino Cardinal Santos approved the request of Father Fuentes (?). He went to the island and church abroad to get a portion of small bone of San Bartolome where his remains where enshrined. Another thing did you know the strait from SJA to the City Hall including the police station is included in the land title (spanish title certificate) of ownership of San Bartolome Church. I think you need to talk to Gelo Fariñas, exec. asst of Father Ric Torrefiel to give you infos. Take care. Santos-Tablante-Toledo-De Jesus Family

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  59. Fides3.7.09

    ...just reading through everyone's posts here make me feel nostalgic...i miss my hometown.

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  60. It was through sheer chance that I stubmled upon this page and it brought back memories and emotions I didn't realize I still had. My father's family grew up on Sanciangco St. in Tonsuya (proprieters of Gonzales & Sons Gravel & Sand, Potpourri Tailors, and Potpourri Engineering), and I spent a part of my childhood there (Roque Subdv.) from 1978-1983 before returning to Chicago where I was born. I haven't been back except very briefly in the early 90's to attend my father's funeral.

    I haven't really thought much about Malabon until now, and thanks to these pictures and comments, I have a flood of fond memories of my childhood years. Thank you all!

    J. Gonzales
    NY, USA

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  61. Irene28.9.09

    Hi to all! i'm also from Malabon City,in Brgy. Tanong. Thank you for this very informative site.I just want to share a few information regarding my hometown. Every 24th of August we celebrate the Feast of San Bartolome. The church always put up exhibits of old pictures of the church and other places around/near it, relics and many more. And yes, including a bone fragment from San Bartolome.

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  62. Hi, I love your blog, but I was wondering if you could maybe put more historical places that I may be able to visit. Thanks!

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  63. panky21.2.10

    wow nkakamiss nman! My family prouldy hails from Malabon! rich tlga ang culture jan! Malabon really has a lot more to offer other than the fact that we are the most bahain na town! it was nice growing up there! good times! funny that you mentioned the confusion about valencia and turon! LOL! I argue about that with my friends.

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  64. I didn't know Rufina patis is from Malabon! My dad loves their patis. I'm enjoying it too, pairing it up with fried fish or with Sinuglaw, Cagayan de Oro's version of 'seviche'.

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  65. Anonymous28.12.11

    Caballero

    HI! Taga Malabon rin ako. From Cayetano Arellano St., Barrio San Agustin, Malabon, Rizal (City). May nakalimutang bangitin ang kaibigan natin. nasa barrio san agustin (along cayetano arellano st.)ang Standard Cigarrete factory. at naalala ko pa during the 60's na may magaling na volleyball team (Bajoga yata iyon?) na ang mga members ay karamihang taga San Agustin, sa likod ng simbahan. Ang isa pang maipagmamalaki naming taga san agustin, malabon ay isang taga Cayetano Arellano rin ang aming mahal na si Col. Ramon (Monching)Camus na siyang Aide de Camp ni President Magsaysay na namatay sa plane crash kasama ang ating President Magsaysay sa Mount Manungal. Ako po ay nagaral sa Epifanio De Los Santos College sa Ilang Ilang st., Concepcion, Malabom Rizal. Hindi ko na alam kung ano ang nangyari sa aking Alma Mater since i graduated last 1965.

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  66. Anonymous5.4.12

    di ko po malilimutan ang gabriel st. tosuya malabon kung saan po ako ay lumaki at nag kaisip. masarap mamuhay sa malabon naging taga pag linis din po ako ng sinbahan ng san antonio di padua sa pangangalaga noon ni aling juana. tumira kami dito since 1972 up to 1981. maraming karanasan ang di ko malilimutan dito. miss ma miss ko na ang malabon ano na kaya ang mukna nito sa ngayon .

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  67. elmer5.4.12

    di ko po malilimutan ang gabriel st. tosuya malabon kung saan po ako ay lumaki at nag kaisip. masarap mamuhay sa malabon naging taga pag linis din po ako ng sinbahan ng san antonio di padua sa pangangalaga noon ni aling juana. tumira kami dito since 1972 up to 1981. maraming karanasan ang di ko malilimutan dito. miss ma miss ko na ang malabon ano na kaya ang mukna nito sa ngayon .

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