Friday, February 06, 2009

Corregidor Island: Battery Way

Battery Way is said to be the most intact of Corregidor's artillery batteries. And it's no surprise that it's one of the most visited and most photographed attractions on the island.

Construction for this battery began in 1904. It was completed in 1914 at a total cost of $112,969 and named in honor of 2nd Lt. Henry N. Way, 4th U.S. Artillery, who died in service in the Philippines in 1900.

Armed with four 12-inch (305mm) M1890 mortar carriages which were capable of lobbing a 1,000-pound (454.5kg) deck piercing shell or 700-pound (318kg) high explosive shell 14,610 yards (8.3 miles or 13.35 km) in any direction.

On May 6, the day Corregidor surrendered, Battery Way continued firing all morning. Only when the breech block of its last gun froze at 11 a.m., warped by the heat from constant firing, did it stop firing. It was the last of Corregidor's "concrete artillery" to cease fire before the surrender at 12 noon.

Main article: Corregidor's artillery batteries
Related article: Corregidor Island day trip via Sun Crusies
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