Wednesday, January 28, 2009

Longaniza or longganisa of the Philippines

Longaniza or longganisa are chorizos flavored with local spices. Each region in the Philippines produces its own longaniza, each with distinct characteristics. Some towns and cities produce popular varieties.

Few people realize that longanizas are not only found in the Philippines. One can encounter them in Spain where they are originally from and other areas with Spanish influences such as Mexico and the rest of Latin America. Classic Spanish sausages include chorizos, longanizas, sobrasadas, morcillas, butiffaras, salchichas and salchichones.

I've always wondered why native sausages made all over the Philippines are all called longaniza or longganisa when in most countries, sausages are given various names depending on the place of origin, ingredients and varieties. While longaniza is the name for native sausages in the Philippines, in some parts of the Visayas and Mindanao, choriso, soriso or tsoriso are more common terms. So I'm starting this series in the hopes of documenting the different varieties of longaniza.

Most longganisas in the Philippines fall under two categories: hamonado (sweet or matamis) and derecado (garlicky or mabawang, sour and/or salty). Do check this entry regularly since I will be updating it and placing the hyperlinks as I upload new posts.

32 comments:

  1. yum...longaniza...chorizo...haaay... my personal favorite is the vigan longaniza, with sinangag and egg...OMG! looking forward to more of your posts!

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  2. I love those round, sweet chorizos (right smack in the middle of your photo), we had them all the time back when I was a kid in Cebu. I don't think I've had that again since I came to Manila. Ah, I miss it.

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  3. Stella B28.1.09

    ANUUVVAAA!!! tama na kaka-post mo ng longganisa... im supposed to be on a diet!!! (pahinging suka please?!?! lol)

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  4. Hi, tinuloy mo ang pinagusapan ng group to document the longaniza's, kudos. Well you can also document the different vinegar that we use with it.

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  5. @Ria, I'll definitely have the Vigan longaniza in the series soon. Tell me if I've missed anything.

    @Dea, I like them too! The one in the center is actually from Leyte which I ate grilled. The to its left is from Carcar, Cebu. But they taste very similar.

    @Lelay, there's more to come!

    @Wilsuan, I really got intrigued with all the varieties. Hehe! So here it is :)

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  6. Heto na nga ang longganisa blog mo! My favorite so far, is still longganisang lucban. But I'm willing to try anything once. Or twice... ;) Thanks, Ivan!

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  7. So far my favorite is the one from Alaminos, maybe biased because we have our roots from there :)

    Seriously, I hope someone does those regional longanisa recipes using grass fed chickens. They say it won't taste as good because there will be no pork fat. But then, we want the taste and being close to that, w/o sacrificing your health, will be good. BUT, don't get me wrong weheee I can have a dozen for breakfast of the good ole longanisa.

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  8. Pa-pass by naman dear blogger. I saw that many love our native longganisas.. I prefer Vigan ang alaminos. And, if anyone's interested w/ alaminos longganisa, visit my blogsite na rin. I'm selling it at P85/dozen (bulk orders or min of 6doz).

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  9. What a coincidence! I just came from Alaminos and munched on some longaniza before turning on my computer. Haha! I'll upload it soon :)

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  10. Wow! My cholesterol is soaring from just looking at the pics!
    I'm wondering why Ivan did not introduce Bourdain to this Filipino culinary delight.

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  11. Ooooooooh I love this post! There's a resto near my house called Sonsi, it sells longganize from different parts of the country. As of my last visit, they had about 6 - 8 kinds and were planning to get some more. You can order a logganiza meal (pick your province of origin) with rice and egg, or get a whole platter! Mmmmm....

    Next to longganiza (and quite related, i think) is my love for different kinds of "suka" from all over the philippines. Mmmm...

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  12. Anonymous23.7.09

    Hi, Ivan.
    Do write about the chorizo in Bacolod. I grew up loving the hamonado and recado ni Tia Pining. Today, they sell bottled chorizo in Sweet Greens, Bacolod.

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  13. I am cravingnow for longganisa. Even my Chinese butcher here in Sydney is selling them [labelled prominently: Philippine Longganis!]. I must try them, you got me going Ivan!

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  14. This might be a lame question to ask so I apologize in advance for my ignorance (hehe) but I really want to know - what is the different between a chorizo and a longganiza? Is there a specific flavoring or spice that makes a chorizo? :)

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  15. Anonymous28.7.09

    You forgot the longganiza of Kalibo. sweet-style and the most popular longganiza of Panay.

    Ryan

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  16. Xavier11.10.09

    daene that is not a lame question at all. Historically in Spain (where these sausages are from originally) and in Latin America (where I'm from originally) the basic difference between them is that the longaniza is fresh (not cured or smoked) and has no saffron. Chorizo is spiced with saffron and aged (cured and some types are smoked as well) until it is dry and hard. But that's how we do it in Latin America and Spain. You may do it differently in the Philippines.

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  17. Anonymous23.11.09

    I am also interested in learning the history of some filipino dishes/recipes such as the longaniza, i am hoping that you can provide more information about its origin and how it evolve in our country...

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  18. To those who want mabawang (garlicky longganisa), you can purchase from me at 350 pesos per kilo only. The longgaisa I sell is direct from Ballesteros, Cagayan and is really very delicious. For more information, see http://kitchenbq.com/ilocos-longganisa-philippine-chorizo/. You can contact me at 09178210225.

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  19. Anonymous27.12.09

    you can visit our restaurant at Sky Garden "Longganisa Sorpresa" and experience the different taste of longganisa

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  20. To my taste, nothing beats the Vigan longaniza. Obviously, the salt, vinegar, garlic and black pepper in it makes the difference. Then each longaniza maker keeps as secret the ratio of the various ingredients.

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  21. my family loves longganisa and chorizo esp the ones from lucban and vigan, but we are adventurous longga lovers so we can try others from diff regions.
    if you know where sonsi is or any place where we can order bulk,please give number and location. thanks.hapi eating from cory

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  22. Anonymous8.11.11

    how i wish anybody from cebu can share to me the recipe of cebu longganiza. i love cebu longganiza pero bawal ipasok dito sa batanes ang anumang klase ng karne dahil FMD free and province namin. lahat ng klase ng karne na papasok d2 ay sinusunog sa airport.

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  23. Anonymous1.1.12

    thanks a lot for sharing.If i am to make longaniza,which do you think will be liked most by canadians?

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  24. Anonymous10.1.12

    Hi! SONSI is located in Madison Square Complex, along Pioneer street, Mandaluyong City. Its near Robinson Boni and near Legend Hotel, Globe building and RFM building. tel number is 0917-801-41-87 and 502-0479. Our products are also available in all RUSTANS and SHOPWISE branches.

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  25. Anonymous30.3.12

    I have tasted different longganisas, from Commercial ones to Alaminos, Vigan, Pampanga, Cebu, Davao, Baguio, Batangas, and Lucban, and the latter variety is, for me, the most delicious.

    – Longganisa Lover

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  26. Anonymous5.4.12

    try tuguegarao's longanisa, it's the best. the casings is natural not collagen casing.

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  27. Hi Ivan. My name is Ted from Davao City. I was force retired more than 3 ago and now decided to be an entrepreneur. I cannot wait anymore for a good job offer. Am not getting any younger and competition is less and less not to my favor considering my age. All my life I have been a mere employee.

    I just applied today at city hall for my first business venture. I'll start small/backyard together with my wife. Am now 51 years old. I would like to seek your consent/permission to use nine(9) of your longganisa pictures posted in your website. I'll use the social network to promote my produce to my friends and will, of course, mention your website. Am an Ilocano but more than half of my life I live here in Mindanao.

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  28. Actually, your website gave me the idea to go into producing longganisas. I've been doing it before making ilocano longganisa but for personal consumption only. My friends here in Davao City told me on a number of occasions to go into the longganisa business many years ago but i just kept on ignoring them. Para akong ginising ng website mo, Ivan, to be honest with you.

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  29. Anonymous13.5.12

    after production date of longganisa,how long should it take for it to expire????

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  30. Anonymous18.5.12

    hey kat! your longganisa is very expensive. I am Cagayano. The price of longganisa here in Cagayan ranging from 170-180 pesos per kilo. Sobra naman ang kita mo pag ibenta mo ng P350 kada kilo.

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  31. Anonymous24.5.12

    Expiration depends on the materials and ingredients, how production is handled and lastly, stored.

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  32. Anonymous29.5.12

    guys have you tried the longganisa from Jocyl's Foods in Kalibo, Aklan! For me it is the best longganisa or chorizo ive ever tasted! Search for them in their website and their FREE Android App.

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